Saturday, January 10, 2009

Bad News for Fish-Thanks Guys

The following are excerpts from the December Rolling Stone issue. No matter what you think of the Bush administration, these new regulations, or deregulations as it were, may spell disaster for fish and wildlife.-BW


The most jaw-dropping of Bush's rule changes is his effort to eviscerate the Endangered Species Act. Under a rule submitted in November, federal agencies would no longer be required to have government scientists assess the impact on imperiled species before giving the go-ahead to logging, mining, drilling, highway building or other development. The rule would also prohibit federal agencies from taking climate change into account in weighing the impact of projects that increase greenhouse emissions — effectively dooming polar bears to death-by-global-warming. According to Carl Pope, executive director of the Sierra Club, "They've taken the single biggest threat to wildlife and said, 'We're going to pretend it doesn't exist, for regulatory purposes.'"

In early December, the administration finalized a rule that allows the industry to dump waste from mountaintop mining into neighboring streams and valleys, a practice opposed by the governors of both Tennessee and Kentucky. "This makes it legal to use the most harmful coal-mining technology available," says Allen Hershkowitz, a senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council. A separate rule also relaxes air-pollution standards near national parks, allowing Big Coal to build plants next to some of America's most spectacular vistas — even though nine of 10 EPA regional administrators dissented from the rule or criticized it in writing. "They're willing to sacrifice the laws that protect our national parks in order to build as many new coal plants as possible," says Mark Wenzler, director of clean-air programs for the National Parks Conservation Association. "This is the last gasp of Bush and Cheney's disastrous policy, and they've proven there's no line they won't cross."

In a rule that becomes effective just three days before Obama takes office, the administration has opened up nearly 2 million acres of mountainous lands in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming for the mining of oil shale — an energy-intensive process that also drains precious water resources. "The administration has admitted that it has no idea how much of Colorado's water supply would be required to develop oil shale, no idea where the power would come from and no idea whether the technology is even viable," says Sen. Ken Salazar of Colorado. What's more, Bush is slashing the royalties that Big Oil pays for oil-shale mining from 12.5 percent to five percent. "A pittance," says Salazar.

3 comments:

troutsahoy said...

If you need some better news (and don't we all), the ocean conditions for 2008 were exceptionally good for juvenile salmon- 2010 should be a good year for adult returns. Let's hope "we" take advantage of this opportunity to let the stocks rebuild a bit, rather than sliding back into the usual temptation of "more fish returned?! Let's kill more of 'em!"

Brad said...

It would be helpful if articles posted included a reference/source. There's a lot of garbage on the internet, and I don't have time to research every issue that pops up. Thanks.

Anonymous said...

Hello, I just found your blog. Great articles. Now you just need a facebook page.